Posts Tagged ‘Mareja community conservation project’

Boots on the Ground: Earthkeepers in Mozambique

A few months back, our CSR manager in Europe received a request from a woman named Sophie Scott, who runs a community conservation program called Mareja in Northern Mozambique.  The program and its challenges, in Sophie’s words:

The plights in this part of the world are many, in a biodiversity hotspot that is virtually unstudied and suffering from extreme poverty …but it is breath-taking with pockets of rare mammals such as wild dog, lion and elephant.

The daily struggles on the reserve are against illegal timber cutting and poaching for ivory and all bush meat.  We have a team of local rangers who do a very difficult job policing the area which is subtropical coastal forest covering 36,000 hectares.

The rangers, Sophie reported, were in dire need of “super smart, durable boots” – and could Timberland help?

Yes, we could.  Two months and many emails back and forth, we were finally able to get some much-needed boots (and t-shirts) to Sophie for her team.  Courtesy of the Mareja blog:

Our donation from Timberland has made a very great difference to the Mareja community and provided an especially happy Christmas.  Domink (a co-director for Mareja) made a speech – explaining that a company called Timberland had recognized the value of our work here, in this remote and poor corner of the earth.  He pointed out the logo which includes a tree and the earth in which it grows – both fundamental aspects we work hard here to protect.  Gathered in a large group in our room sitting on a carpet, they all found the symbol on their new T-shirt … the room was thick with a feeling that they and their work were valued and recognized – work for forest conservation.

Antonio, our cook, in new outfit

Old carpenter repairing main roof (he was very pleased to have his picture taken)

Massalino (Ranger) helping with the new roof

We’re so happy to support this incredible team of rangers and to equip them to make their difference in one corner of the earth.  To learn more about Mareja’s work, please visit their blog.