Posts Tagged ‘Seventh Generation’

Ceres Sustainability Reporting Awards

At the annual Ceres conference held earlier this week, Timberland was very proud to accept the award for the Best Sustainability Report.  We’re honored to receive this important recognition, particularly considering the first-class caliber of contenders we were up against, including:

Ford Motor Company
(First Runner Up, Best Sustainability Report)

Ford’s 2008-09 Blueprint for Sustainability Report addresses the fundamental challenge of sustainability and includes candid discussion about Ford’s past performance, mistakes made and how they’re working to further integrate sustainability into their business model.

Seventh Generation

(Best  Small and Medium-Sized Enterprise Report)

Seventh Gen’s 2008 Corporate Consciousness Report includes focus on two key considerations for sustainable business: supply chain and competition.  The report features an in-depth discussion about how the company engages with its manufacturing partners to improve sustainability performance, as well as how it uses industry collaboration to create positive change.

The fact that the Ceres-ACCA Reporting Awards program is ten years old and counting is testament itself that there is a real need for and interest in business communicating openly and honestly about its efforts to create positive environmental and social impact.  We’ve drawn insight and inspiration from past award recipients, and we hope we can live up to their leadership and do the same for other organizations.

For more information about the Ceres-ACCA Reporting Awards, click here.

Timberland Perspectives: The Truth About Transparency

A Responsibility Revolution Extra Guest Post from Jeffrey Hollender & Bill Breen

During the two years they spent writing The Responsibility Revolution, authors Jeffrey Hollender and Bill Breen conducted an intensive series of interviews at key companies on the leading edge of the corporate responsibility movement. In this bonus excerpt from Bill’s conversations with Timberland CEO Jeffrey Swartz and Timberland CSR Strategy Manager Beth Holzman, they share some of the additional insights and perspectives these encounters provided:

No company can claim to be authentically responsible if it doesn’t dare to get a little naked. Radical transparency—revealing your good, bad, and ugly impacts on society and the environment—is the first step toward turning critics into collaborators and collectively inventing aggressive ways to operate sustainably. As we show in The Responsibility Revolution, few publicly traded enterprises have done as much as Timberland to innovate around transparency.

Along with Nike and Gap, Timberland was among the first big brands to reveal the locations of its suppliers’ factories and open them up to outside scrutiny. More recently, Timberland developed its Green Index tag, modeled on a nutrition label, which rates many of the company’s hiking boots and shoes on their environmental impact. There’s also the quarterly phone dialogs with CEO Jeffrey Swartz, in which callers query him about hot-button issues like eco-labeling and sustainable sourcing, and many more strategies for building a glass house.

When Bill Breen and I reviewed his interviews with Swartz, Beth Holzman, and other corporate-responsibility execs, we found that they’d dug into five essential truths about transparency. Each comes through hard-won experience.

Transparency is often irritating, difficult, and scary.

Swartz: Our efforts to be more transparent around our good and bad impacts on society and the environment started with the disingenuous discourse between activists and brands about where our factories are located. It was kind of a silly argument. It’s not hard to figure out where 300 million shoes are manufactured in China. Ten minutes with a phone book would give you the addresses. I didn’t want to have that conversation. And the best way to not have the conversation was to simply reveal the damn locations.

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Every Crawler Counts

This month, our friends at Seventh Generation launched the Million Baby Crawl , a new initiative to engage consumers in support of reforming the nation’s toxic chemical laws.

Million Baby Crawl is a virtual rally in which cyber babies descend on Washington, D.C. to make a stink (get it?) about all the toxic chemicals invading their bodies. At www.millionbabycrawl.com , you can create your very own crawler, watch videos of babies pontificating atop soap-boxes (like the one below), and spread the word. Every crawler represents a virtual signature on a petition which will be delivered to Washington, D.C. in January, 2010.

The federal law that should protect us from health-harming chemicals just doesn’t work: Since 1976, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has required safety testing on only 200 of the more than 80,000 chemicals on the market. We need a stronger chemical law to keep our families (and our environment) safe and healthy.

Seventh Generation has partnered with Safer Chemicals, Healthy Families , a growing and diverse coalition that includes nurses, parents, scientists, environmentalists and citizens from across the country who are united by their concern about toxic chemicals in our homes, workplaces and products we use every day.

Create your own crawler and support the effort for stronger chemical laws at www.millionbabycrawl.com .